Apr
25
4:30 pm16:30

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

  • Doe Library, Morrison Reading Room

Speaker: Richard Rothstein, Research Associate, Economic Policy Institute

Panelist/Discussants: Janelle Scott, Associate Professor, Berkeley, GSE; Michael J. Dumas, Assistant Professor, Berkeley, GSE; sean reardon, Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education and Professor (by courtesy) of Sociology, Stanford University

Sponsor: Graduate School of Education

Richard Rothstein, author and Research Associate at the Economic Policy Institute, will offer insights into how residential segregation in America — the incessant kind that continues to dog our major cities and has contributed to so much ongoing social strife — is the intended result of racially explicit government policies at the local, state, and federal levels.

Rothstein's latest book, "The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America," is scheduled for release May 2017. 

He will be joined in conversation with three scholars: 

Michael J. Dumas, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education, Berkeley

Janelle Scott, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education, Berkeley

sean reardon, Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education and Professor (by courtesy) of Sociology, Stanford

This timely event includes opening remarks by GSE Dean Prudence L. Carter, and a book signing with Richard Rothstein immediately afterward. Books will be available for purchase.

Event contact: gsenews@berkeley.edu

Apr
19
12:00 pm12:00

Absence, Substitutability and Productivity. Evidence from Teachers

  • IRLE

Asma Benhenda, PhD Student, Paris School of Economics and IRLE Visiting Scholar

It’s not unusual for employees to miss work from time to time. Little is known, however, about how worker absences affect productivity, and how employers cope with absenteeism. We do know that in schools, disruption can be especially harmful. IRLE Visiting Scholar Asma will present research, based on administrative data on French teachers and substitute teachers, analyzing the effect of teacher absences on the productivity of classrooms and the quality of instruction. Benhenda’s work shows that temporary teachers come with a severe reduction in quality. Since substitute and contract teachers are more common in disadvantaged schools, this could be a source of inequality among students.

Read more about Asma.

Asma Benhenda is a PhD student at the Paris School of Economics and a visiting scholar at IRLE, where her work focuses on education. In addition to her scholarly work, she has written for Le Monde and other general-interest publications.

Apr
17
12:00 pm12:00

NEW DATE: Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence From the Golden Era of Upward Mobility

  • IRLE

Lowell Taylor, Professor of Economics at Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University

The first half of the twentieth century witnessed an extraordinary expansion of educational opportunity in the U.S. Professor Taylor will explore intergenerational links in educational outcomes during this golden age of upward mobility, using household data from the 1940s. His research shows that for white, black, Chinese, and Japanese Americans, social mobility was especially high in Pacific states and especially low in southern ones. And for children with poorly educated parents – but not for those with well-educated parents – upward mobility was intimately linked to the local resources devoted to public education.

 

Lowell J. Taylor is the H. John Heinz III Professor of Economics at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University.  He is also a Senior Fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago, where he serves as Principal Investigator of the 1997 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY97).  Taylor’s research is mostly in labor economics and demography. 

Apr
6
10:00 am10:00

The History of Higher Education in California: Big Data Approach

  • 180 Doe Library

Speaker/Performer: Zach Bleemer

Sponsor: Library

In his talk, Zach Bleemer will discuss how he has used data science - thousands of computer-processed versions of annual registers, directories, and catalogs - to reconstruct a near-complete database of all students, faculty, and courses at four-year universities in California in the first half of the 20th century, including the UC system. Visualizations of this database display the expansion of higher education into rural California communities, the rise and fall of various academic departments and disciplines, and the slow (and still-incomplete) transition towards egalitarian major selection. Zach will also discuss his recent CSHE Working Paper, in which he uses additional digitized records to analyze the social impact of the early 20th century's expansion of female high school science teachers and female doctors across rural California communities. He finds that newly-arrived female STEM professionals serve as important role models for young women in these rural communities, causing substantial increases in female college-going. However, these young women are no more likely to study STEM fields or become doctors themselves. He is currently extending these results to estimate ethnicity-based role model effects.

Event contact: mphillip@library.berkeley.edu, 510-643-8766

Apr
5
12:00 pm12:00

The Dynamics of Household Economic Security Around A Birth

  • Institute for Research on labor and Employment

Alexandra Stanczyk, Postdoctoral Scholar at the School of Social Welfare, UC Berkeley

Newborns require a lot of resources. And with the changes in income composition that come with a birth, many families face financial uncertainty. This has implications for children’s health and development, women’s economic security, and public program design. This research finds that households see significant and enduring declines in economic security before and after a birth, with especially large income drops for single mothers who live alone. Exisiting safety nets buffer these declines, but they do not eliminate them. More generous and timely income supports, as well as policies facilitating mothers’ employment, could shore families up during this critical period.

Apr
3
12:00 pm12:00

Innovations in Hiring Practices: Encouraging Social Inclusion & Diversity in the Workplace

  • ells Fargo Room, Haas School of Business

DESCRIPTION

Join us for a lunch-time panel which will discuss better alternatives to traditional hiring practices to create work forces that are not only productive but also socially inclusive and diverse.

Companies sometimes do a poor job of predicting future job performance and often discriminate against underrepresented minorities. How can companies avoid these pitfalls and implement better hiring practices? How can companies better work with their existing staff to also create more inclusive and welcoming environments which inherently attracts more diverse candidates?

This panel will discuss exciting, out-of-the-box hiring projects such as Microsoft's Autism Hiring Program, the Adobe Digital Academy, and IDEO is working on designing a world-case recruiting experience. These are programs that go beyond traditional hiring practices to intentionally help create workplaces that are more inclusive, diverse, and lead to better employee retention. They will also consider how their companies identify the challenges involved with creating inclusive and diverse workplaces, how to then research these problems and prototype solutions.

 

Mar
15
12:00 pm12:00

Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence From the Golden Era of Upward Mobility

  • IRLE

Lowell Taylor, Professor of Economics at Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University

The first half of the twentieth century witnessed an extraordinary expansion of educational opportunity in the U.S. Professor Taylor will explore intergenerational links in educational outcomes during this golden age of upward mobility, using household data from the 1940s. His research shows that for white, black, Chinese, and Japanese Americans, social mobility was especially high in Pacific states and especially low in southern ones. And for children with poorly educated parents – but not for those with well-educated parents – upward mobility was intimately linked to the local resources devoted to public education.

Mar
8
12:00 pm12:00

Intergenerational Income Mobility in Canada and the United States

  • UC Berkeley

Marie Connolly, Université du Québec à Montréal

Please note that this event will be held at 223 Moses Hall.

Intergenerational mobility is about twice as great in Canada than in the United States, but varies significantly within each country. Our sub-national analysis of six different indicators finds that the national border only partially distinguishes the close to one thousand regions we analyze within these two countries. The Canada-US border clearly divides Central and Eastern Canada from the Great Lakes regions and the Northeast of the United States. But these differences drive only part of the national differences in mobility. While some Canadian regions have more in common with the low mobility southern parts of the United States than with the rest of Canada, the fact that they represent a much smaller fraction of population is the other reason why overall mobility is lower in the United States.

Co-Sponsored by the UC Berkeley Canadian Studies Program.

This event made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco | Silicon Valley.

Mar
2
3:00 pm15:00

Buddhist Economics: An Enlightened Approach to the Dismal Science

  • UC Berkeley

Clair Brown, UC Berkeley Department of Economics

Brown advocates an approach to organizing the economy that embraces, rather than skirts, questions of values, sustainability, and inequality. Complementing the award-winning work of Paul Krugman and Jeffrey Sachs, and the paradigm-breaking spirit of Thomas Piketty and Amartya Sen, Brown incorporates the Buddhist emphasis on interconnectedness, capability, and happiness into her vision for a sustainable and compassionate world.

Read more about the book here.

Registration for this event is required.

 

Feb
27
12:00 pm12:00

The State of the Early Childhood Educator Workforce: Misaligned Expectations, Earnings and policies

  • University of California, Berkeley

Description
Marcy Whitebook will give a talk titled "The State of the Early Childhood Educator Workforce: Misaligned Expectations, Earnings and policies" as part of the Policy Research Seminar series.

The Policy Research Seminar is an ongoing series in which academics present their policy-relevant research and we discuss the policy implications of their findings. For a complete list of speakers participating in the series this fall, click here.

About the Speaker
Marcy Whitebook understands the relationship between appropriate preparation, support, and compensation for early educators and the quality of services for young children having begun her professional life as an infant and toddler and preschool teacher. Early in her career, Marcy and a handful of other teachers set out to improve early care and education services by securing rights, raises, and respect for the early childhood workforce. Prior to her current work as the founding director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California, Berkeley, Marcy founded the Washington-based Center for the Child Care Workforce (CCW), an organization she began in 1977 as the Child Care Employee Project. She earned a master’s degree in Early Childhood Education from UC Berkeley and a Ph.D. in Developmental Studies from the UCLA Graduate School of Education.

Feb
24
8:30 am08:30
Feb
23
12:00 pm12:00

Managing Climate Risks with CO2 Mitigation Policy

  • University of California, Berkeley

Description
Delevane Diaz will give a talk titled "Managing Climate Risks with CO2 Mitigation Policy" as part of the Policy Research Seminar series.

The Policy Research Seminar is an ongoing series in which academics present their policy-relevant research and we discuss the policy implications of their findings. For a complete list of speakers participating in the series this fall, click here.

About the Speaker
Delavane Diaz is a Senior Technical Leader in the Energy and Environmental Analysis program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), where she focuses on the implications of climate and energy policy on the electric sector, resiliency and risk management strategies, and the social cost of carbon.

Delavane joined EPRI in 2008, working on research projects related to mitigation policy proposals and generation capacity planning. She recently returned from pursuing her doctorate. Her dissertation examined the representation of climate impacts, adaptation, and technology costs in integrated assessment models, with a specific focus on coastal vulnerability and sea level rise.

Before joining EPRI, Delavane served as an Air Force acquisitions officer, working on a space surveillance radar program at Hanscom AFB, MA.

Delavane is a distinguished graduate of the US Air Force Academy with a B.S. in Astronautical Engineering. She earned a M.Sc. in Environmental Change and Management at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar and a Ph.D. in Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University.

Feb
22
4:00 pm16:00

Schedule Instability and Unpredictability and Worker and Family Health and Wellbeing

  • Wildavsky Conference Room, ISSI

Daniel Schneider, Assistant Professor, Sociology, UC Berkeley

The American labor market is increasingly unequal, characterized by extraordinary returns to work at the top of the market but rising precarity and instability at the bottom of the market. In addition to low wages, short tenure, few benefits, and non¬standard hours, many jobs in the retail and food service industries are characterized by a great deal of instability and unpredictability in work schedules. Such workplace practices may have detrimental effects on workers. However, the lack of existing suitable data has precluded empirical investigation of how such scheduling practices affect the health and wellbeing of workers and their families. We describe an innovative approach to survey data collection from targeted samples of service¬ sector workers that allows us to collect previously unavailable data on scheduling practices and on health and wellbeing. We then use these data to show that exposure to unstable and unpredictable schedules is negatively associated with household financial security, worker health, and parenting practices.

Feb
14
11:00 am11:00

Securing Research Data

  • University of California, Berkeley

Across campus, researchers face an increasingly complex set of requirements to protect their research data.  While many researchers have developed innovative approaches to accomplish their research, others encounter significant obstacles.  Campus support and guidance for research on these kinds of data sets is uneven at best.  

In this Love Your Data week discussion, Jon Stiles (Federal Statistical RDC) will build on a short introductory discussion with Jesse Rothstein (Public Policy and Economics, IRLE), Carl Mason (Demography) on rewards and challenges of researching and supporting groundbreaking research resources with sensitive or restricted data.  Campus staff and attendees will explore services needed to unlock the research potential of restricted data.  Attendees are also invited to participate in a new D-Lab Working Group focusing on Securing Research Data.

Panel presented by the UC Berkeley Library and the Research Data Management

Feb
6
12:00 pm12:00

Policy Research Seminar

  • University of California, Berkeley

Description
The Policy Research Seminar is an ongoing series in which academics present their policy-relevant research and we discuss the policy implications of their findings. For a complete list of speakers participating in the series this fall, click here.

About the Speaker
Avi Feller is an assistant professor at the Goldman School, where he works at the intersection of public policy, data science, and statistics. His methodological research centers on learning more from social policy evaluations, especially randomized experiments. His applied research focuses on working with governments on using data to design, implement, and evaluate policies. Prior to his doctoral studies, Feller served as Special Assistant to the Director at the White House Office of Management and Budget and worked at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Feller received a Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University, an M.Sc. in Applied Statistics as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, and a B.A. in Political Science and Applied Mathematics from Yale University.

Jan
25
12:00 pm12:00

Spatialized ethno-racial inequality and labor market outcomes in Los Angeles

  • IRLE Director's Room

How does spatialized ethno-racial inequality contribute to labor market outcomes? Professor Ong will discuss his conceptual and empirical approach to modeling the relationship between ethnic and racial stratification and labor market outcomes, primarily in the city of Los Angeles.

Paul Ong will be a visiting scholar at HIFIS during spring of 2017. Professor Ong has done research on the labor market status of minorities and immigrants, displaced high-tech workers, work and welfare and transportation access. He is currently engaged in several projects, including studies on the effects of neighborhood economies on welfare and work, community economic development in minority communities, and the labor market for healthcare workers.

For more information contact Margaret Olney, margaret_olney@berkeley.edu 

Dec
7
12:00 pm12:00

The State of the Early Childhood Educator Workforce: Misaligned Expectations, Earnings and Policies

  • IRLE CONFERENCE ROOM

Marcy Whitebook & Lea Austin, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, UC Berkeley

Early educators are among the lowest-paid workers in the country, yet the work they do is critically important for children, families, and the economy. The Center for the Study of Child Care Employment (CSCCE) at IRLE recently released the inaugural edition of a biennial report on the early care and education workforce: The Early Childhood Workforce Index. The report represents the first effort to establish a baseline description of early childhood employment conditions and policies in every state. Based on a series of measurable indicators, the report provides states with overall appraisals of their efforts to address persistent challenges facing the early childhood workforce, including policies such as minimum wage and paid family leave legislation. Co-authors Marcy Whitebook, Caitlin McLean, and Lea Austin will discuss key findings of the report and its implications for policy.

R.S.V.P. Margaret Olney, margaret_olney@berkeley.edu

Nov
30
12:00 pm12:00

The Effect of the EITC in the District of Columbia on Poverty and Income

  • IRLE CONFERENCE ROOM

Bradley Hardy, School of Public Affaris, American University

Using unique longitudinal administrative tax panel data for the District of Columbia (DC), we assess the combined effect of the DC supplemental earned income tax credit (EITC) and the federal EITC on poverty and income within Washington, DC from 2001 to 2013. The EITC in DC merits investigation, as the DC supplement to the federal credit is the largest in the nation. The supplemental DC EITC was enacted in 2000, and has been expanded from 10 percent of the federal credit in 2001 to 40 percent as of 2009. To implement the study, we estimate least squares models with 0/1 dependent variables to estimate the likelihood of net-EITC income above poverty and near-poverty thresholds. We also estimate the likelihood of income growth from the EITC. To identify the effect of the EITC, we exploit time series variation in the city-wide EITC as well as a federal EITC subsidy rate changes from 2008 to 2009. The structure and richness of our data enable us to control for tax filer fixed effects, an important innovation from many previous EITC studies. Overall, we find that the combined EITC raises the likelihood of net-EITC income above poverty and near poverty, with the largest consistent effects accruing to single-parent families.

R.S.V.P. Margaret Olney, margaret_olney@berkeley.edu

Nov
16
12:00 pm12:00

Expansion or Diversion? New Universities and Enrollment Choices in California

  • IRLE CONFERENCE ROOM

Patrick Lapid, Economics, UC Berkeley

Do non-tuition costs constrain college access? From 1995 to 2005, four new public universities in California began admitting first-year students. I exploit these new campus openings to test if relaxing distance cost constraints will increase four-year college enrollment among local high school graduates. I show that distance is still influential in the first-time enrollment of recent high school graduates; the majority of enrollees in public four-year colleges stay within 50 miles of home, with approximately 40 percent enrolled only 25 miles away from their high school of origin. Using event study and difference-in-difference models, I find that new university openings increase four-year enrollment among recent high school graduates from treated schools within 0 to 25 miles of the new campus; the estimated share of high school graduates enrolling in any public four-year college rises by 1.6 percentage points, an increase of over 8 percent in the mean four-year college attendance share. Three-quarters of this increase is driven by local students attending the new universities; enrollment to existing campuses from local high schools is unaffected. Students from treated schools without an existing public university within 25 miles are more likely to attend the new university when it opens, but there are no other significant differences in enrollment outcomes to new campuses between richer and poorer schools, nor between under-represented minority (URM) and White/Asian students at the same schools. My findings support the view that cost-of-living constraints are binding for many prospective college students.

R.S.V.P. Margaret Olney, margaret_olney@berkeley.edu

Nov
9
12:00 pm12:00

Seeing Like a Market

  • IRLE CONFERENCE ROOM

Marion Fourcade, Sociology, UC Berkeley

What do markets see when they look at people? Information dragnets increasingly yield huge quantities of individual-level data, which is analyzed to sort and slot people into categories of taste, riskiness, or worth. Developed to better understand and improve customer experience, these tools also define new strategies of profit making. In this mainly theoretical talk, I will discuss how the facticity of these scoring methods makes them organizational devices with powerful classifying effects, structuring product and price offerings on various markets and patterning life-chances for individuals. I will also suggest that these processes generate a new economy of moral judgment, where rankings outcomes produced through behavioral tracking are increasingly experienced as morally deserved positions.

R.S.V.P. Margaret Olney, margaret_olney@berkeley.edu

Oct
27
6:00 pm18:00

Come Here, Get Rich: Immigration, Upward Mobility and California Labor History

UC Berkeley Labor Center. 2521 Channing Way, Berkeley. 

 

Event Speaker: Fred Glass

Join us for a conversation with Fred Glass, longtime friend of the Labor Center and author of a new book, From Mission to Microchip: A History of the California Labor Movement. The author will delve deep into the vibrant labor history of the Golden State where workers have engaged in politics, strikes, and a variety of organizing strategies to find common ground among its diverse communities to achieve a measure of economic fairness and social justice.

There is no better time than now to consider the labor history of the Golden State. While other states face declining union enrollment rates and the rollback of workers’ rights, California unions are embracing working immigrants, and voters are protecting core worker rights. What’s the difference? California has held an exceptional place in the imagination of Americans and immigrants since the Gold Rush, which saw the first of many waves of working people moving to the state to find work. From Mission to Microchip unearths the hidden stories of these people throughout California’s history. The difficult task of the state’s labor movement has been to overcome perceived barriers such as race, national origin, and language to unite newcomers and natives in their shared interest. This is an indispensable book for students and scholars of labor history and history of the West, as well as labor activists and organizers.

This event is free and open to the public.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event. Books are also available online from UC Press.

Space is limited. Please register for the event.