Nov
2
4:00pm 4:00pm

The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America

General Motors, General Electric, Kodak, Coca-Cola. Once, big companies like these took responsibility for providing their workers and retirees with an array of social benefits. They believed that pay needed to be kept high in order to preserve morale and keep the economy humming. Productivity boomed.

But today, as precarious work expands and pensions dwindle, many workers no longer feel that their employers are looking out for them. Rick Wartzman’s book The End of Loyalty charts the paths of four large companies through the post-World War II boom years, the turbulence of the seventies and eighties, and the advent of downsizing and outsourcing, and examines the changing relationships between employers and employees.

Discussants: James Lincoln, Haas School of Business, and David Levine, Haas School of Business

Rick Wartzman directs the KH Moon Center for a Functioning Society at the Drucker Institute, where he works to make institutions more effective at helping people thrive. He spent two decades working as a reporter, editor, and columnist for the Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Times. His other writings explore California history and the world of work, and he is a regular contributor at Fortune online.

James Lincoln is the Mitsubishi Chair in International Business and Finance, emeritus, at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. He served as director of the IRLE from 1997 to 2002. His research and writings have focused on Japanese  management, organizational design, organizational theory, and industrial relations.

David Levine is professor of business administration at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. Before coming to Haas, he was a senior economist on the Council of Economic Advisers and a senior research economist at the US Department of Labor. His research interests include the causes and effects of high wages and workplace diversity, and the causes and effects of investments in health and education.

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Nov
2
4:00pm 4:00pm

The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America

Once, big companies took responsibility for their workers’ wellbeing, with high pay and reliable benefits. But as precarious work expands and pensions dwindle, many workers no longer feel that their employers are looking out for them. Author Rick Wartzman follows four corporate giants – General Electric, General Motors, Kodak, and Coca-Cola – through the twentieth century’s booms and busts, examining the changing relationships between employers and employees.

The discussion will be moderated by James Lincoln and David Levine, both from the the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley.

Please register to secure your spot.

Thursday, November 2, 4:00 pm
IRLE Director’s Room
Lecture will be followed by a reception.

Rick Wartzman directs the KH Moon Center for a Functioning Society at the Drucker Institute. He also writes for Fast Company and hosts a podcast on the intersection of business and society called The Bottom Line.

James Lincoln is the Mitsubishi Chair in International Business and Finance, emeritus, at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. He was director of the IRLE from 1997 to 2002.

David Levine teaches business administration at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. He was previously a senior economist on the Council of Economic Advisers and a senior research economist at the US Department of Labor.

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Nov
7
8:30am 8:30am

Breaking the Cycle: Improving Outcomes for California’s High Need, High Cost Population

A slim slice of California’s citizens use the majority of government services.  At hospitals, jails, and homeless shelters across the state, we see familiar faces again and again.  Many of these people suffer from mental health, substance abuse, or persistent health conditions. Are we serving their needs effectively, efficiently, and equitably?

Several cities and counties around the state – from San Diego to Humboldt – are seeking to identify and address these “frequent utilizers.”  Some of these efforts are focused specifically on health-care utilization and Whole Person Care.  Other efforts are trying to reduce frequent contacts with law enforcement by testing new diversion options.  And still others are trying to solve the state’s homelessness crisis, and are finding that housing-first models have downstream benefits in improving health and criminal justice outcomes.

The California Policy Lab is hosting a conference on November 7 that aims to integrate each of these valuable perspectives and provide a platform for sharing lessons learned between localities that are working on similar problems.

We will hear from national experts about which interventions are most promising.  We will hear from counties that have integrated data on high utilizers and have surprising findings about the population.  We will hear from practitioners about potential obstacles to success ­– including coordination across modalities, data linking, and public affairs strategies – and how to overcome them.

Registration is subject to space limitations and host approval.

Register

Program

8:30 – 9:30

Registration and breakfast

9:30 – 9:45

Welcome

9:45 – 11:00

Session 1: Three lenses on a similar problem
How are health, homelessness, and criminal justice practitioners approaching the issue of high utilization?  What lessons can each offer the others?  What promising efforts are ongoing nationwide?

11:20 – 12:35

Session 2: Understanding California’s high-utilizing population
How to we define utilization?  What attributes distinguish the highest utilizers?  What patterns or trends do we see?  What subgroups, taxonomies, or frameworks help disaggregate potential problems and solutions?

12:35 – 1:40

Lunch

1:50 – 3:20

Session 3: Outcomes and interventions
What interventions are promising? What are the differences between criminal justice, health, and housing interventions? What evidence gaps remain?

3:40 – 5:10

Session 4: Overcoming practical challenges
How to accomplish data integration? How to get momentum across several public agencies?  What public affairs strategies work best?

5:15 – 6:30

Reception

This event is organized by the California Policy Lab, which enables better lives through data-driven policy. We do this by generating evidence that transforms public policy by forming lasting partnerships between government and California’s flagship public universities to harness the power of research and administrative data. We have sites at UCLA and UC Berkeley, where we are a center of the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment.

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Nov
16
5:00pm 5:00pm

Dependence and Precarity in the “Sharing” Economy

The sharing economy was supposed to change the world. So-called “collaborative consumption” would encourage social connection, use assets more efficiently, and reduce ecological footprints. Sharing economy platforms have indeed disrupted whole industries and changed the way we do business. But the most important impacts of the sharing economy may be its unintended consequences rather than its ambitious intentions – especially for workers, the way they interact with employers and consumers, and the inequities they face. Using interviews with earners on Airbnb, TaskRabbit, Uber, Lyft, Postmates, and Favor, Schor examines the experiences of workers as they navigate the sharing economy.

Discussants: Annette Bernhardt, IRLE’s Labor Center, and Ruth Berins Collier, UC Berkeley Political Science

Location forthcoming.

Juliet Schor is a sociologist at Boston College and a member of the MacArthur Foundation Connected Learning Research Network. Her work has focused on consumer society, sustainable consumption, new economies, and overwork. A former Guggenheim Fellow, she has served as a consultant to the United Nations.

Ruth Berins Collier is a professor in UC Berkeley’s political science department. Her research, across Latin America, Africa, and Europe, has focused on forms of popular participation, political regime and regime change, and labor politics.

Annette Bernhardt directs the Low-Wage Work Program at the IRLE’s Labor Center. She has been a leader in collaborating with immigrant worker centers and unions to develop innovative models of community-based research. Her current research focuses on domestic outsourcing, the gig economy, and the impact of new technologies on low- wage work.

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Nov
16
5:00pm 5:00pm

Dependence and Precarity in the “Sharing” Economy

  • The Maude Fife Room, Wheeler Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The sharing economy debuted to grand claims about its ability to change the world for the good–it would encourage social connection, use assets more efficiently, and be better for the environment. For earners on platforms, it promised flexibility, freedom and the ability to become a “micro-entrepreneur.” Ten years in, the reality is far more complex. In this talk, Schor discusses her interview-based research with workers on six platforms, and argues that contrary to the expectations of both boosters and critics, outcomes are highly diverse, and depend to a large extent on workers’ non-platform economic situations. The discussion will be moderated by Annette Bernhardt from the UC Berkeley Labor Center and Professor Ruth Collier from the UC Berkeley Political Science Department.

This event is cosponsored by the Scholars Strategy Network.

Please register to secure your spot.

Thursday, November 16, 4:00 pm
The Maude Fife Room, Wheeler Hall, UC Berkeley
Lecture will be followed by a reception.

Juliet Schor is a sociologist at Boston College. Her work focuses on consumer society, sustainable consumption, new economies, and overwork. A former Guggenheim Fellow, she has served as a consultant to the United Nations.

Ruth Berins Collier teaches political science at UC Berkeley. Her research, across Latin America, Africa, and Europe, has focused on popular participation, political regime change, and labor politics.

Annette Bernhardt directs the Low-Wage Work Program at IRLE’s Labor Center. She focuses on domestic outsourcing, the gig economy, and the impact of new technologies on low-wage work.

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Oct
19
4:00pm 4:00pm

Beyond “Resistance”: A Bold Plan for Work With Dignity via a Federal Job Guarantee

  • Maude Fife Room at UC 315 Wheeler Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In 2017, Liberals in the United States are calling for “resistance” to regressive policies. Grassroots movements like the Fight for $15 show a desire for an offensive strategy on the left, but Professor Hamilton suggests that they do not go far enough. Raising the minimum wage still leaves many workers unemployed or out of the workforce altogether, especially those stigmatized by race, disability, or having been formerly incarcerated.

Instead, Professor Hamilton and his colleagues propose a bold federal job guarantee, providing economic security and decent wages for every American. The discussion will be moderated by Ken Jacobs and Steven Pitts of the IRLE’s Labor Center, along with Richard Walker of the UC Berkeley Geography Department.

Please register to secure your spot.

This event is co-sponsored by the UC Berkeley Economics Department.

Thursday, October 19, 4:00 pm
The Maude Fife Room, Wheeler Hall, UC Berkeley
Lecture will be followed by a reception.

Darrick Hamilton is associate professor of economics and urban policy at the Milano School of International Affairs, Management and Urban Policy and the Department of Economics, New School for Social Research.

Ken Jacobs chairs the Labor Center at IRLE. He specializes in low-wage work, labor standards policies, and health care coverage.

Steven Pitts is associate chair of the Labor Center at IRLE, where he focuses on job quality and Black workers.

Richard Walker is professor emeritus at UC Berkeley’s Geography Department. He focuses on human geography, economic geography, and urban geography, with a particular interest in the geographical evolution of capitalism.

 

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Oct
9
12:00pm12:00pm

Discussion with Chief Economist of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Dr. Yasuyuki Sawada

Join us as the Chief Economist of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Dr. Yasuyuki Sawada, discusses the ADB’s key strategies and prospects in the Asian Pacific region with the Berkeley community on Monday, October 9th, from 12:00 -1:30 p.m.

in Stephen’s Lounge. Dr. Sawada will cover:

• Economic prospects for developing Asia and the Pacific

• Key risks to the region’s outlook

• Implications of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet normalization for Asia

• What is behind the recent uptick in trade and whether it can be sustained

• Measures governments can take to promote public-private partnerships and ensure their success

Lunch will be provided and there will be ample opportunity to ask questions of Dr. Sawada and meet other UCB development experts. Please register here.

The Organizers

The Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA) is a research hub for global development, with a network of over 75 academic researchers extending across the University of California, Stanford University, University of Washington, and the University of British Columbia. Our faculty affiliates use rigorous evaluations, tools from data science, and new measurement technologies to assess the impacts of large-scale social and economic development programs. CEGA brings a scientific lens to global development, integrating empirical economic analysis with expertise in agriculture, public health, education, engineering, and the environment.

International Development and Enterprise Club (IDEC) brings together a network of graduate students interested in exploring the connection between development and enterprise. It was founded in 2005 at the Haas School of Business by students with deep interests in international development in a wide range of sectors including Public Health, IT & Telecommunications, Energy, Financial Services, Education, and Agriculture. IDEC's aim is to connect the Berkeley community with leading practitioners, researchers and specialists in related fields to understand current practices and explore future career opportunities.

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Sep
14
7:00pm 7:00pm

Refinery Town: Big Oil, Big Money, and the Remaking of an American City

Home to one of the largest oil refineries in the state, Richmond, California, was once a traditional company town dominated by Chevron. This largely nonwhite city of 110,000 suffered from poverty, pollution, violent street crime, and poorly funded public services. But in 2012, when journalist Steve Early moved to Richmond, he encountered a community that was bravely struggling to reinvent itself. In his new book Refinery Town, Early chronicles the fifteen years of civic activism that improved public safety, raised Richmond’s minimum wage, challenged home foreclosures and evictions, and demanded fair taxation of Big Oil and Big Soda. This compelling story of a city remade provides a model for citizens engaged in local politics and community building anywhere.

Please RSVP to this free event.

Co-sponsored by the California Studies Association and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

This talk is part of the California Studies Dinners series, a forum for the discussion of California politics, economy, and society that meets once a month on the Berkeley campus. It brings together scholars, students, and specialists from around the Bay Area to hear speakers talk about new books, research and ideas of note concerning California. The series has been going strong for twenty years (with a predecessor going back thirty years!), and is the finest intellectual forum on California history, geography and public affairs in Northern California.

Steve Early is a labor journalist, lawyer, organizer, and union representative. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, Mother Jones, and many other publications

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Sep
7
4:00pm 4:00pm

IRLE Fall Reception: Featuring Professor Daniel Schneider on Unstable Work Schedules in Retail

It’s no secret that the American labor market is increasingly unequal for workers. While work for the highest earners yields ever-higher returns, work at the bottom is becoming more and more unpredictable and insecure. In addition to low wages, short tenure, few benefits, and non-standard hours, workers specifically in retail and food service often face schedules that are unstable and unpredictable. How does this affect their health and well being? And how has public policy impacted these workers?

The presentation and discussion with Professor Daniel Schneider will be followed by a reception in IRLE’s library commons. Please register so that we can plan refreshments.

Daniel Schneider is an assistant professor of sociology at UC Berkeley, where his work focuses on social demography, inequality, wealth, family, and household finance.

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Aug
24
6:00pm 6:00pm

Technology, Health & Equality

In an age of sophisticated healthcare technologies and research tools, the doctors you see or hospitals you visit are only a small part of what determines your health. Through extensive research and data analysis, one doctor has discovered that your zip code may matter more to your well-being than your genetic code.

Dr. Anthony Iton first witnessed the link between health and socio-economic status as a Johns Hopkins medical student working in East Baltimore at the height of the crack and AIDS epidemics. This connection became more clear in his role as the director of the Public Health Department for Alameda County. As the person responsible for signing the county’s thousands of death certificates, Dr. Iton started to notice patterns in the ages, causes of death, ethnicities, and zip codes of the deceased. Since then, he has dedicated his career to researching these correlations across the country. Today, Dr. Iton is focused on improving health conditions in 14 low-income communities throughout California as the senior vice president of the California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative.

http://www.computerhistory.org/events/upcoming/#technology-health--equality

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Apr
25
4:30pm 4:30pm

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

Speaker: Richard Rothstein, Research Associate, Economic Policy Institute

Panelist/Discussants: Janelle Scott, Associate Professor, Berkeley, GSE; Michael J. Dumas, Assistant Professor, Berkeley, GSE; sean reardon, Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education and Professor (by courtesy) of Sociology, Stanford University

Sponsor: Graduate School of Education

Richard Rothstein, author and Research Associate at the Economic Policy Institute, will offer insights into how residential segregation in America — the incessant kind that continues to dog our major cities and has contributed to so much ongoing social strife — is the intended result of racially explicit government policies at the local, state, and federal levels.

Rothstein's latest book, "The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America," is scheduled for release May 2017. 

He will be joined in conversation with three scholars: 

Michael J. Dumas, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education, Berkeley

Janelle Scott, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education, Berkeley

sean reardon, Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education and Professor (by courtesy) of Sociology, Stanford

This timely event includes opening remarks by GSE Dean Prudence L. Carter, and a book signing with Richard Rothstein immediately afterward. Books will be available for purchase.

Event contact: gsenews@berkeley.edu

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Apr
19
12:00pm12:00pm

Absence, Substitutability and Productivity. Evidence from Teachers

Asma Benhenda, PhD Student, Paris School of Economics and IRLE Visiting Scholar

It’s not unusual for employees to miss work from time to time. Little is known, however, about how worker absences affect productivity, and how employers cope with absenteeism. We do know that in schools, disruption can be especially harmful. IRLE Visiting Scholar Asma will present research, based on administrative data on French teachers and substitute teachers, analyzing the effect of teacher absences on the productivity of classrooms and the quality of instruction. Benhenda’s work shows that temporary teachers come with a severe reduction in quality. Since substitute and contract teachers are more common in disadvantaged schools, this could be a source of inequality among students.

Read more about Asma.

Asma Benhenda is a PhD student at the Paris School of Economics and a visiting scholar at IRLE, where her work focuses on education. In addition to her scholarly work, she has written for Le Monde and other general-interest publications.

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Apr
17
12:00pm12:00pm

NEW DATE: Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence From the Golden Era of Upward Mobility

Lowell Taylor, Professor of Economics at Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University

The first half of the twentieth century witnessed an extraordinary expansion of educational opportunity in the U.S. Professor Taylor will explore intergenerational links in educational outcomes during this golden age of upward mobility, using household data from the 1940s. His research shows that for white, black, Chinese, and Japanese Americans, social mobility was especially high in Pacific states and especially low in southern ones. And for children with poorly educated parents – but not for those with well-educated parents – upward mobility was intimately linked to the local resources devoted to public education.

 

Lowell J. Taylor is the H. John Heinz III Professor of Economics at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University.  He is also a Senior Fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago, where he serves as Principal Investigator of the 1997 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY97).  Taylor’s research is mostly in labor economics and demography. 

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Apr
6
10:00am10:00am

The History of Higher Education in California: Big Data Approach

Speaker/Performer: Zach Bleemer

Sponsor: Library

In his talk, Zach Bleemer will discuss how he has used data science - thousands of computer-processed versions of annual registers, directories, and catalogs - to reconstruct a near-complete database of all students, faculty, and courses at four-year universities in California in the first half of the 20th century, including the UC system. Visualizations of this database display the expansion of higher education into rural California communities, the rise and fall of various academic departments and disciplines, and the slow (and still-incomplete) transition towards egalitarian major selection. Zach will also discuss his recent CSHE Working Paper, in which he uses additional digitized records to analyze the social impact of the early 20th century's expansion of female high school science teachers and female doctors across rural California communities. He finds that newly-arrived female STEM professionals serve as important role models for young women in these rural communities, causing substantial increases in female college-going. However, these young women are no more likely to study STEM fields or become doctors themselves. He is currently extending these results to estimate ethnicity-based role model effects.

Event contact: mphillip@library.berkeley.edu, 510-643-8766

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Apr
5
12:00pm12:00pm

The Dynamics of Household Economic Security Around A Birth

  • Institute for Research on labor and Employment (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Alexandra Stanczyk, Postdoctoral Scholar at the School of Social Welfare, UC Berkeley

Newborns require a lot of resources. And with the changes in income composition that come with a birth, many families face financial uncertainty. This has implications for children’s health and development, women’s economic security, and public program design. This research finds that households see significant and enduring declines in economic security before and after a birth, with especially large income drops for single mothers who live alone. Exisiting safety nets buffer these declines, but they do not eliminate them. More generous and timely income supports, as well as policies facilitating mothers’ employment, could shore families up during this critical period.

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Apr
3
12:00pm12:00pm

Innovations in Hiring Practices: Encouraging Social Inclusion & Diversity in the Workplace

  • ells Fargo Room, Haas School of Business (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

DESCRIPTION

Join us for a lunch-time panel which will discuss better alternatives to traditional hiring practices to create work forces that are not only productive but also socially inclusive and diverse.

Companies sometimes do a poor job of predicting future job performance and often discriminate against underrepresented minorities. How can companies avoid these pitfalls and implement better hiring practices? How can companies better work with their existing staff to also create more inclusive and welcoming environments which inherently attracts more diverse candidates?

This panel will discuss exciting, out-of-the-box hiring projects such as Microsoft's Autism Hiring Program, the Adobe Digital Academy, and IDEO is working on designing a world-case recruiting experience. These are programs that go beyond traditional hiring practices to intentionally help create workplaces that are more inclusive, diverse, and lead to better employee retention. They will also consider how their companies identify the challenges involved with creating inclusive and diverse workplaces, how to then research these problems and prototype solutions.

 

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Mar
15
12:00pm12:00pm

Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence From the Golden Era of Upward Mobility

Lowell Taylor, Professor of Economics at Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University

The first half of the twentieth century witnessed an extraordinary expansion of educational opportunity in the U.S. Professor Taylor will explore intergenerational links in educational outcomes during this golden age of upward mobility, using household data from the 1940s. His research shows that for white, black, Chinese, and Japanese Americans, social mobility was especially high in Pacific states and especially low in southern ones. And for children with poorly educated parents – but not for those with well-educated parents – upward mobility was intimately linked to the local resources devoted to public education.

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Mar
8
12:00pm12:00pm

Intergenerational Income Mobility in Canada and the United States

Marie Connolly, Université du Québec à Montréal

Please note that this event will be held at 223 Moses Hall.

Intergenerational mobility is about twice as great in Canada than in the United States, but varies significantly within each country. Our sub-national analysis of six different indicators finds that the national border only partially distinguishes the close to one thousand regions we analyze within these two countries. The Canada-US border clearly divides Central and Eastern Canada from the Great Lakes regions and the Northeast of the United States. But these differences drive only part of the national differences in mobility. While some Canadian regions have more in common with the low mobility southern parts of the United States than with the rest of Canada, the fact that they represent a much smaller fraction of population is the other reason why overall mobility is lower in the United States.

Co-Sponsored by the UC Berkeley Canadian Studies Program.

This event made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco | Silicon Valley.

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Mar
2
3:00pm 3:00pm

Buddhist Economics: An Enlightened Approach to the Dismal Science

Clair Brown, UC Berkeley Department of Economics

Brown advocates an approach to organizing the economy that embraces, rather than skirts, questions of values, sustainability, and inequality. Complementing the award-winning work of Paul Krugman and Jeffrey Sachs, and the paradigm-breaking spirit of Thomas Piketty and Amartya Sen, Brown incorporates the Buddhist emphasis on interconnectedness, capability, and happiness into her vision for a sustainable and compassionate world.

Read more about the book here.

Registration for this event is required.

 

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Feb
27
12:00pm12:00pm

The State of the Early Childhood Educator Workforce: Misaligned Expectations, Earnings and policies

  • University of California, Berkeley (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Description
Marcy Whitebook will give a talk titled "The State of the Early Childhood Educator Workforce: Misaligned Expectations, Earnings and policies" as part of the Policy Research Seminar series.

The Policy Research Seminar is an ongoing series in which academics present their policy-relevant research and we discuss the policy implications of their findings. For a complete list of speakers participating in the series this fall, click here.

About the Speaker
Marcy Whitebook understands the relationship between appropriate preparation, support, and compensation for early educators and the quality of services for young children having begun her professional life as an infant and toddler and preschool teacher. Early in her career, Marcy and a handful of other teachers set out to improve early care and education services by securing rights, raises, and respect for the early childhood workforce. Prior to her current work as the founding director of the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment at the University of California, Berkeley, Marcy founded the Washington-based Center for the Child Care Workforce (CCW), an organization she began in 1977 as the Child Care Employee Project. She earned a master’s degree in Early Childhood Education from UC Berkeley and a Ph.D. in Developmental Studies from the UCLA Graduate School of Education.

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Feb
24
8:30am 8:30am
Feb
23
12:00pm12:00pm

Managing Climate Risks with CO2 Mitigation Policy

  • University of California, Berkeley (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Description
Delevane Diaz will give a talk titled "Managing Climate Risks with CO2 Mitigation Policy" as part of the Policy Research Seminar series.

The Policy Research Seminar is an ongoing series in which academics present their policy-relevant research and we discuss the policy implications of their findings. For a complete list of speakers participating in the series this fall, click here.

About the Speaker
Delavane Diaz is a Senior Technical Leader in the Energy and Environmental Analysis program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), where she focuses on the implications of climate and energy policy on the electric sector, resiliency and risk management strategies, and the social cost of carbon.

Delavane joined EPRI in 2008, working on research projects related to mitigation policy proposals and generation capacity planning. She recently returned from pursuing her doctorate. Her dissertation examined the representation of climate impacts, adaptation, and technology costs in integrated assessment models, with a specific focus on coastal vulnerability and sea level rise.

Before joining EPRI, Delavane served as an Air Force acquisitions officer, working on a space surveillance radar program at Hanscom AFB, MA.

Delavane is a distinguished graduate of the US Air Force Academy with a B.S. in Astronautical Engineering. She earned a M.Sc. in Environmental Change and Management at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar and a Ph.D. in Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University.

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Feb
22
4:00pm 4:00pm

Schedule Instability and Unpredictability and Worker and Family Health and Wellbeing

Daniel Schneider, Assistant Professor, Sociology, UC Berkeley

The American labor market is increasingly unequal, characterized by extraordinary returns to work at the top of the market but rising precarity and instability at the bottom of the market. In addition to low wages, short tenure, few benefits, and non¬standard hours, many jobs in the retail and food service industries are characterized by a great deal of instability and unpredictability in work schedules. Such workplace practices may have detrimental effects on workers. However, the lack of existing suitable data has precluded empirical investigation of how such scheduling practices affect the health and wellbeing of workers and their families. We describe an innovative approach to survey data collection from targeted samples of service¬ sector workers that allows us to collect previously unavailable data on scheduling practices and on health and wellbeing. We then use these data to show that exposure to unstable and unpredictable schedules is negatively associated with household financial security, worker health, and parenting practices.

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Feb
14
11:00am11:00am

Securing Research Data

  • University of California, Berkeley (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Across campus, researchers face an increasingly complex set of requirements to protect their research data.  While many researchers have developed innovative approaches to accomplish their research, others encounter significant obstacles.  Campus support and guidance for research on these kinds of data sets is uneven at best.  

In this Love Your Data week discussion, Jon Stiles (Federal Statistical RDC) will build on a short introductory discussion with Jesse Rothstein (Public Policy and Economics, IRLE), Carl Mason (Demography) on rewards and challenges of researching and supporting groundbreaking research resources with sensitive or restricted data.  Campus staff and attendees will explore services needed to unlock the research potential of restricted data.  Attendees are also invited to participate in a new D-Lab Working Group focusing on Securing Research Data.

Panel presented by the UC Berkeley Library and the Research Data Management

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Feb
6
12:00pm12:00pm

Policy Research Seminar

Description
The Policy Research Seminar is an ongoing series in which academics present their policy-relevant research and we discuss the policy implications of their findings. For a complete list of speakers participating in the series this fall, click here.

About the Speaker
Avi Feller is an assistant professor at the Goldman School, where he works at the intersection of public policy, data science, and statistics. His methodological research centers on learning more from social policy evaluations, especially randomized experiments. His applied research focuses on working with governments on using data to design, implement, and evaluate policies. Prior to his doctoral studies, Feller served as Special Assistant to the Director at the White House Office of Management and Budget and worked at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Feller received a Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University, an M.Sc. in Applied Statistics as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, and a B.A. in Political Science and Applied Mathematics from Yale University.

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Jan
25
12:00pm12:00pm

Spatialized ethno-racial inequality and labor market outcomes in Los Angeles

How does spatialized ethno-racial inequality contribute to labor market outcomes? Professor Ong will discuss his conceptual and empirical approach to modeling the relationship between ethnic and racial stratification and labor market outcomes, primarily in the city of Los Angeles.

Paul Ong will be a visiting scholar at HIFIS during spring of 2017. Professor Ong has done research on the labor market status of minorities and immigrants, displaced high-tech workers, work and welfare and transportation access. He is currently engaged in several projects, including studies on the effects of neighborhood economies on welfare and work, community economic development in minority communities, and the labor market for healthcare workers.

For more information contact Margaret Olney, margaret_olney@berkeley.edu 

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